Multnomah County Government Employee Salaries, Wages, and Benefits | GovDocs

Multnomah County Employee Salary Information

go to: oregoncapitolnews.com

Ever wondered how much Multnomah County officials make? Oregon Capitol News now provides a searchable database of worker salary information for Multnomah County.

All Multnomah County employee salary information is supplied by Multnomah County as public record. This information is current as of June 27th, 2010 when we obtained it from the County.

Department — All — Community Justice Community Services County Human Services County Management DCHS DDIPS DCJ-JSD Custody Support Services District Attorney’s Office Emergency Management Health Human Services Library Library-Access Services-Midland Library-Gregory Heights Library-Woodstock Mental Health and Addiction Services Non-Departmental School and Community Partnership Sheriff’s Office
Position — All — A&T ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT A&T COLLECTION SPECIALIST A&T DATA VERIFICATION OPERATOR A&T DATA VERIFICATION OPR SENIOR A&T TECHNICIAN 1 A&T TECHNICIAN 2 AA/EEO OFFICER ACCESS SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR ADDICTION SPECIALIST ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYST ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYST/SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATIVE SERV OFFICER ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST/NR ALARM ORDINANCE COORDINATOR ALARM TECHNICIAN ANIMAL CARE AIDE ANIMAL CARE TECHNICIAN ANIMAL CONTROL AIDE ANIMAL CONTROL DISPATCHER ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER ANIMAL HEALTH TECHNICIAN ARBORIST/VEGETATION SPECIALIST ASST COUNTY ATTORNEY 1 ASST COUNTY ATTORNEY 2 ASST COUNTY ATTORNEY/SENIOR BACKGROUND INVESTIGATOR BASIC SKILLS EDUCATOR BODY AND FENDER TECHNICIAN BRIDGE MAINTENANCE MECHANIC BRIDGE MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR BRIDGE OPERATOR BUDGET ANALYST BUDGET ANALYST/PRINCIPAL BUDGET ANALYST/SENIOR BUILDING AUTOMATION SYSTEM SPECIALIST BUSINESS ANALYST BUSINESS ANALYST/SENIOR CAPTAIN CARPENTER CASE MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT CASE MANAGER 1 CASE MANAGER 2 CASE MANAGER/SENIOR CATALOGING ADMINISTRATOR CHAPLAIN CHIEF APPRAISER CHIEF DEPUTY CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER CIVIL DEPUTY CIVIL DEPUTY/SENIOR CLERICAL UNIT SUPERVISOR CLINIC MEDICAL ASSISTANT CLINICAL COORDINATOR COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSE COMMUNITY HEALTH SPECIALIST 1 COMMUNITY HEALTH SPECIALIST 2 COMMUNITY INFORMATION SPEC COMMUNITY JUSTICE MANAGER COMMUNITY WORKS LEADER CONTRACT SPECIALIST CONTRACT SPECIALIST SENIOR CONTRACT TECHNICIAN COOK CORRECTIONS COUNSELOR CORRECTIONS HEARINGS OFFICER CORRECTIONS OFFICER CORRECTIONS SERGEANT CORRECTIONS TECHNICIAN COUNTY ATTORNEY COUNTY AUDITOR COUNTY CHAIR COUNTY COMMISSIONER COUNTY SURVEYOR COUNTY WEB MANAGER CREATIVE MEDIA COORDINATOR D A INVESTIGATOR D A INVESTIGATOR/CHIEF DATA ANALYST DATA ANALYST SR DATA TECHNICIAN DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR/SENIOR DENTAL ASSISTANT DENTAL ASSISTANT/EFDA DENTAL DIRECTOR/CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENIST DENTIST DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR 1 DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR 2 DEPUTY COUNTY ATTORNEY DEPUTY DIRECTOR DEPUTY DIST ATTY/FIRST ASST DEPUTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY 1 DEPUTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY 2 DEPUTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY 3 DEPUTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY 4 DEPUTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY/CHIEF DEPUTY HEALTH OFFICER DEPUTY MEDICAL EXAMINER DEPUTY PUBLIC GUARDIAN DEPUTY SHERIFF DEVELOPMENT ANALYST DEVELOPMENT ANALYST/SENIOR DISEASE INTERVENTION SPECIALIST DISTRICT ATTORNEY DRIVER ELECTIONS MANAGER ELECTRICIAN ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN/CHIEF ELIGIBILITY SPECIALIST EMS MEDICAL DIRECTOR ENGINEER 1(INTERN) ENGINEER 2 ENGINEER 3 ENGINEERING SERVICES MANAGER 2 ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN 1 ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN 2 ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST SR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SUPERVISOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH TRAINEE EQUIPMENT/PROPERTY TECHNICIAN FAC MAINT DISPATCH/SCHEDULER FACILITIES DEV & SERVICES MGR FACILITIES SPECIALIST 1 FACILITIES SPECIALIST 2 FACILITIES SPECIALIST 3 FACILITY SECURITY OFFICER FAMILY INTERVENTION SPECIALIST FINANCE MANAGER FINANCE SPECIALIST 1 FINANCE SPECIALIST 2 FINANCE SPECIALIST/SENIOR FINANCE SUPERVISOR FINANCE TECHNICIAN FLEET MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR FLEET MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN 2 FLEET MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN 3 FOOD SERVICE WORKER GIS CARTOGRAPHER GIS CARTOGRAPHER SR GRAPHIC DESIGNER HEALTH ASSISTANT 1 HEALTH ASSISTANT 2 HEALTH EDUCATOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNICIAN HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNICIAN/SENIOR HEALTH OFFICER HEALTH SERVICES DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATO HEALTH SERVICES MANAGER/SENIOR HOUSING DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST HUMAN RESOURCES ANALYST 1 HUMAN RESOURCES ANALYST 2 HUMAN RESOURCES ANALYST/SENIOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER 1 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER 2 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER/SENIOR HUMAN RESOURCES TECHNICIAN HUMAN SERVICES INVESTIGATOR HVAC ASSISTANT HVAC ENGINEER ICS DIRECTOR INFORMATION SPECIALIST 1 INFORMATION SPECIALIST 2 INFORMATION SPECIALIST 3 INVENTORY/STORES SPECIALIST I INVENTORY/STORES SPECIALIST II INVENTORY/STORES SPECIALIST III INVESTIGATIVE TECHNICIAN IT BUSINESS CONSULTANT/SR IT MANAGER 1 IT MANAGER 2 IT MANAGER/SENIOR IT PROJECT MANAGER 1 IT PROJECT MANAGER 2 IT SECURITY MANAGER IT SUPERVISOR JUVENILE COUNSELOR JUVENILE CUSTODY SERVICES SPEC LEGAL ASSISTANT 1 LEGAL ASSISTANT 2 LEGAL ASSISTANT 2/NR LEGAL ASSISTANT SR/NR LEGAL ASSISTANT/SENIOR LEGISLATIVE/ADMIN SECRETARY LIBRARIAN LIBRARY ADMINISTRATOR/BRANCH LIBRARY ADMINISTRATOR/CENTRAL LIBRARY ASSISTANT LIBRARY CLERK LIBRARY MANAGER/BRANCH LIBRARY MANAGER/SENIOR LIBRARY OUTREACH SPECIALIST LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY SUPERVISOR LICENSED COMM PRACTICAL NURSE LIEUTENANT LIEUTENANT/CORRECTIONS LIGHTING TECHNICIAN LOCKSMITH LOGISTICS EVIDENCE TECH MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST 1 MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST 2 MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST APPRENTICE MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST/SENIOR MAINTENANCE WORKER MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT MANAGEMENT AUDITOR/SENIOR MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELOR MCSO CORRECTIONS PROGRAM ADMIN MCSO RECORDS SUPERVISOR MCSO RECORDS TECHNICIAN MCSO VOLUNTEER PROGRAM COORDINATOR MEDICAL DIRECTOR MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST MEDICATION AIDE/CNA MENTAL HEALTH CONSULTANT MENTAL HEALTH DIRECTOR MOTOR POOL ATTENDANT NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR/SENIOR NUISANCE ENFORCEMENT OFFICER NURSE PRACTITIONER NUTRITION ASSISTANT NUTRITION SERVICES MANAGER NUTRITIONIST NUTRITIONIST SUPERVISOR OFFICE ASSISTANT 2 OFFICE ASSISTANT/SENIOR OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATOR OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR PATHOLOGIST ASSISTANT PAYROLL SPECIALIST PHARMACIST PHARMACY SERVICES DIRECTOR PHARMACY TECHNICIAN PHYSICIAN PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PLANNER PLANNER/PRINCIPAL PLANNER/SENIOR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR PRINTING SPECIALIST PROBATION/PAROLE OFFICER PROCUREMENT ANALYST PROCUREMENT ANALYST/SR PROCUREMENT ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION ASSISTANT PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR PROGRAM COMMUNICATIONS & WEB SPEC PROGRAM COMMUNICATIONS & WEB SPEC/SR PROGRAM COORDINATOR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPEC PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPEC/SR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT TECH PROGRAM MANAGER 1 PROGRAM MANAGER 2 PROGRAM MANAGER/SENIOR PROGRAM SUPERVISOR PROJECT MANAGER PROJECT MANAGER – REPRESENTED PROPERTY APPRAISER 1 PROPERTY APPRAISER REAL 2 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST/SENIOR PSYCHIATRIST PUBLIC AFFAIRS COORDINATOR PUBLIC HEALTH ECOLOGIST PUBLIC HEALTH VECTOR SPECIALIST PUBLIC RELATIONS COORDINATOR RECORDS ADMINISTRATION ASST RECORDS ADMINISTRATOR RECORDS TECHNICIAN RESEARCH SCIENTIST RESEARCH/EVALUATION ANALYST 1 RESEARCH/EVALUATION ANALYST 2 RESEARCH/EVALUATION ANALYST/SENIOR RESEARCH/EVALUATION ANALYST/SENIOR NR RIGHT-OF-WAY PERMITS SPECIALIST ROAD OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR SERGEANT SEWING SPECIALIST SHERIFF SIGN FABRICATOR SOCIAL WORKER STAFF ASSISTANT STRIPER OPERATOR SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AGENT SURVEY SUPERVISOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR/SENIOR TAX EXEMPTION SPECIALIST TAX SUPR/ADMIN OFFICER TAX SUPR/BUDGET ANALYST TEAM DEVELOPER/LIBRARY TRANSPORTATION PLANNING SPECIALIST TRANSPORTATION PROJECT SPECIALIST VETERANS SERVICES OFFICER VETERINARIAN VICTIM ADVOCATE VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR WEATHERIZATION INSPECTOR X-RAY TECHNICIAN
First Name
Last Name
Annual Compensation — All — $0 – $10,000 $10,000 – $20,000 $20,000 – $30,000 $30,000 – $40,000 $40,000 – $50,000 $50,000 – $60,000 $60,000 – $70,000 $70,000 – $80,000 $80,000 – $90,000 $90,000 – $100,000 $100,000+
Date Requested: 6/22/10 Estimated cost: $123.06
Date Obtained: 6/28/10 Actual Cost: $123.06
Status: Obtained Fee waiver: Not requested

As you can see, government workers are barely getting by! Go ahead and go through the pages and pages of COUNTY workers who are living hand to mouth existence. Of course they need a pay raise!!

On the other hand, I’m wondering why a monopoly labor force is granted monopoly union status? The people who decide upon “wage scale” are compensated by.. the same source.. the taxpayer. So who is watching the hen house? It’s possible the system is a bit… biased? IF any one of these government employees were to compete in the private sector with their skill set, I wonder what that would look like? I’m sure there are people with excellent skills who love their “public service” employment- that is not so difficult to understand. At the same time, is the taxpayer paying far more than what they should? I think it’s a legitimate question that should be examined in light of the examples we are seeing all across the nation when it comes to government employee unions.

We’ve Become a Nation of Takers, Not Makers

By STEPHEN MOORE

If you want to understand better why so many states—frmooreom New York to Wisconsin to California—are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy, consider this depressing statistic: Today in America there are nearly twice as many people working for the government (22.5 million) than in all of manufacturing (11.5 million). This is an almost exact reversal of the situation in 1960, when there were 15 million workers in manufacturing and 8.7 million collecting a paycheck from the government.

It gets worse. More Americans work for the government than work in construction, farming, fishing, forestry, manufacturing, mining and utilities combined. We have moved decisively from a nation of makers to a nation of takers. Nearly half of the $2.2 trillion cost of state and local governments is the $1 trillion-a-year tab for pay and benefits of state and local employees. Is it any wonder that so many states and cities cannot pay their bills?

Every state in America today except for two—Indiana and Wisconsin—has more government workers on the payroll than people manufacturing industrial goods. Consider California, which has the highest budget deficit in the history of the states. The not-so Golden State now has an incredible 2.4 million government employees—twice as many as people at work in manufacturing. New Jersey has just under two-and-a-half as many government employees as manufacturers. Florida’s ratio is more than 3 to 1. So is New York’s.

Even Michigan, at one time the auto capital of the world, and Pennsylvania, once the steel capital, have more government bureaucrats than people making things. The leaders in government hiring are Wyoming and New Mexico, which have hired more than six government workers for every manufacturing worker.

Now it is certainly true that many states have not typically been home to traditional manufacturing operations. Iowa and Nebraska are farm states, for example. But in those states, there are at least five times more government workers than farmers. West Virginia is the mining capital of the world, yet it has at least three times more government workers than miners. New York is the financial capital of the world—at least for now. That sector employs roughly 670,000 New Yorkers. That’s less than half of the state’s 1.48 million government employees.

ImageZoo/Corbis

moore

moore

Don’t expect a reversal of this trend anytime soon. Surveys of college graduates are finding that more and more of our top minds want to work for the government. Why? Because in recent years only government agencies have been hiring, and because the offer of near lifetime security is highly valued in these times of economic turbulence. When 23-year-olds aren’t willing to take career risks, we have a real problem on our hands. Sadly, we could end up with a generation of Americans who want to work at the Department of Motor Vehicles.

The employment trends described here are explained in part by hugely beneficial productivity improvements in such traditional industries as farming, manufacturing, financial services and telecommunications. These produce far more output per worker than in the past. The typical farmer, for example, is today at least three times more productive than in 1950.

Where are the productivity gains in government? Consider a core function of state and local governments: schools. Over the period 1970-2005, school spending per pupil, adjusted for inflation, doubled, while standardized achievement test scores were flat. Over roughly that same time period, public-school employment doubled per student, according to a study by researchers at the University of Washington. That is what economists call negative productivity.

But education is an industry where we measure performance backwards: We gauge school performance not by outputs, but by inputs. If quality falls, we say we didn’t pay teachers enough or we need smaller class sizes or newer schools. If education had undergone the same productivity revolution that manufacturing has, we would have half as many educators, smaller school budgets, and higher graduation rates and test scores.

The same is true of almost all other government services. Mass transit spends more and more every year and yet a much smaller share of Americans use trains and buses today than in past decades. One way that private companies spur productivity is by firing underperforming employees and rewarding excellence. In government employment, tenure for teachers and near lifetime employment for other civil servants shields workers from this basic system of reward and punishment. It is a system that breeds mediocrity, which is what we’ve gotten.

Most reasonable steps to restrain public-sector employment costs are smothered by the unions. Study after study has shown that states and cities could shave 20% to 40% off the cost of many services—fire fighting, public transportation, garbage collection, administrative functions, even prison operations—through competitive contracting to private providers. But unions have blocked many of those efforts. Public employees maintain that they are underpaid relative to equally qualified private-sector workers, yet they are deathly afraid of competitive bidding for government services.

President Obama says we have to retool our economy to “win the future.” The only way to do that is to grow the economy that makes things, not the sector that takes things.

Mr. Moore is senior economics writer for The Wall Street Journal editorial page.

 

The Truth about the NEA- Government Teachers Union

The NEA stands for.. well, I’ll let the former President of the Union tell you in his own words.

The lust for POWER is the single most important struggle for the NEA. The Union is far left in all matters social and political- They want nothing to do with allowing educational choices. This is a huge money tree that they have carved out for themselves and they fully intend to shake it for all it’s worth. Saul Alinsky is one of the founding organizers of the NEA.. and his tactics, political persuasion, and lust for power is quite evident. No doubt the NEA is the single most influential reasons our educational system has declined so far, so fast.

at 3.33 into the video he get’s to his main point..

Alinsky references of note:

http://www.nea.org/tools/17231.htm

http://michellemalkin.com/2011/03/01/educate-collaborate-agitate-alinskys-tea…